The Count of Monte Cristo.  Alexandre Dumas père
Chapter 67. At the Office of the King's Attorney (第67章. 檢察官的辦公室)
< Prev. Chapter  |  Next Chapter >
Font: 

Let us leave the banker driving his horses at their fullest speed, and follow Madame Danglars in her morning excursion. We have said that at half-past twelve o'clock Madame Danglars had ordered her horses, and had left home in the carriage. She directed her course towards the Faubourg Saint Germain, went down the Rue Mazarine, and stopped at the Passage du Pont-Neuf. She descended, and went through the passage. She was very plainly dressed, as would be the case with a woman of taste walking in the morning. At the Rue Guenegaud she called a cab, and directed the driver to go to the Rue de Harlay. As soon as she was seated in the vehicle, she drew from her pocket a very thick black veil, which she tied on to her straw bonnet. She then replaced the bonnet, and saw with pleasure, in a little pocket-mirror, that her white complexion and brilliant eyes were alone visible. The cab crossed the Pont-Neuf and entered the Rue de Harlay by the Place Dauphine; the driver was paid as the door opened, and stepping lightly up the stairs Madame Danglars soon reached the Salle des Pas-Perdus.

我們暫且撇開驅馬疾馳回家的那位銀行家不談,來跟蹤一下騰格拉爾夫人的晨游。我們在前面已經說過,騰格拉爾夫人在十二點半的時候吩咐套車備馬,要出門。她驅車順著圣·日爾曼路折入了瑪柴林街,在奈夫巷口下了車,穿過了那條小巷。她的穿著非常朴素,很象是一個喜歡早晨出門的普通女子。她在琪尼茄路叫了一輛出租馬車,吩咐驅車到哈萊路去。一坐進車廂里,她就從口袋里摸出一塊极厚的黑色面紗,綁在她的草帽上。然后她戴上帽子,掏出一面小鏡子照了照,發覺所能看到的只有她那雪白的皮膚和那一對明亮的眼睛,心里覺得很高興。那輛出租馬車穿過了奈夫大道,從道芬廣場轉入了哈萊路。車門一打開,車費便已到了車夫手里,騰格拉爾夫人輕捷地踏上樓梯,不久便到了高等法院的大廳里。

There was a great deal going on that morning, and many business-like persons at the Palais; business-like persons pay very little attention to women, and Madame Danglars crossed the hall without exciting any more attention than any other woman calling upon her lawyer. There was a great press of people in M. de Villefort's ante-chamber, but Madame Danglars had no occasion even to pronounce her name. The instant she appeared the door-keeper rose, came to her, and asked her whether she was not the person with whom the procureur had made an appointment; and on her affirmative answer being given, he conducted her by a private passage to M. de Villefort's office. The magistrate was seated in an arm-chair, writing, with his back towards the door; he did not move as he heard it open, and the door-keeper pronounce the words, "Walk in, madame," and then reclose it; but no sooner had the man's footsteps ceased, than he started up, drew the bolts, closed the curtains, and examined every corner of the room. Then, when he had assured himself that he could neither be seen nor heard, and was consequently relieved of doubts, he said,—"Thanks, madame,—thanks for your punctuality;" and he offered a chair to Madame Danglars, which she accepted, for her heart beat so violently that she felt nearly suffocated.

  那天早晨有一件大案子要開庭審理,法院里有許多忙忙碌碌的人。人們极少去注意女人,所以騰格拉爾夫人穿過大廳的時候,并沒人惹起多大的注意。維爾福先生的候見室里擠著一大堆人,但騰格拉爾夫人卻連姓名也不必通報。她一出現,接待員便立刻起身向她迎上來,問她是不是檢察官約見的那個人,她作了一個肯定的表示,于是他就領她從一條秘密甬道走進了維爾福先生的辦公室。那位法官正坐在一張圈椅里,背對著門,正在那儿寫什么東西。听到門打開的聲音,接著又听到聲“請進,夫人,”然后又听到門關上的聲音,他都沒有動;但一到那個人的腳步聲消失以后,他就立刻跳起身來,閂上門,拉上窗帘,檢查一下房間的每一個角落。然后,當他确定決不會有人看到或听到時,才放下心來,他說道:“謝謝,夫人——謝謝您准時到來。”他遞了一張椅子給騰格拉爾夫人,她接受了,因為她的心此時跳得非常厲害,几乎快要窒息了。

  “夫人,”檢察官把椅子轉過來半圈,使自己和騰格拉爾夫人面對面,“夫人,我有很久沒有享受到和您單獨敘談的愉快了,而我們這次相見,卻是要作一番痛苦的談話,我很感抱歉。”

  “可是,閣下,您看,你一約我,我就來了,盡管對于這次談話,我肯定比您要痛苦得多。”

"It is a long time, madame," said the procureur, describing a half-circle with his chair, so as to place himself exactly opposite to Madame Danglars,—"it is a long time since I had the pleasure of speaking alone with you, and I regret that we have only now met to enter upon a painful conversation."

"Nevertheless, sir, you see I have answered your first appeal, although certainly the conversation must be much more painful for me than for you." Villefort smiled bitterly.

  維爾福苦笑了一下。“那么,古人說得沒錯了,”他說道,他這時倒象是在朗誦他心里的念頭,而不象在對他的同伴講話,“那么,古人說得沒錯了,我們的种种舉動都在我們的人生道路上留下了它們的痕跡——有傷心,有歡樂!那么,古人說得沒錯:我們在人生道路上的每一個腳步都象在一片沙上爬行的昆虫一樣——都留下了痕跡!唉!有很多人,在那條路上留下的痕跡是眼淚滴成的呵。”

"It is true, then," he said, rather uttering his thoughts aloud than addressing his companion,—"it is true, then, that all our actions leave their traces—some sad, others bright—on our paths; it is true that every step in our lives is like the course of an insect on the sands;—it leaves its track! Alas, to many the path is traced by tears."

  “閣下,”騰格拉爾夫人說道,“您可以想象得出我現在的心情,是嗎?那么,別讓我受這种折磨了吧,我求求您了!當我望著這個房間的時候,我想到,曾有多少罪人含羞帶愧,渾身戰栗地离開這儿,而當我望著我現在所坐的這張椅子的時候,我又想到有多少人曾含羞帶愧,渾身戰栗地站在它的前面——噢!我必須用我的全部理智,才能使自己相信我并不是一個罪惡的女人,而您也不是一個气勢洶洶的法官。”

"Sir," said Madame Danglars, "you can feel for my emotion, can you not? Spare me, then, I beseech you. When I look at this room,—whence so many guilty creatures have departed, trembling and ashamed, when I look at that chair before which I now sit trembling and ashamed,—oh, it requires all my reason to convince me that I am not a very guilty woman and you a menacing judge." Villefort dropped his head and sighed. "And I," he said, "I feel that my place is not in the judge's seat, but on the prisoner's stool."

  維爾福低頭歎了一口气。“而我,”他說,“我覺得我不是坐在法官的審判席上,而是坐在犯人的凳子上。”

  “您?”騰格拉爾夫人惊愕地說道。

  “是的,我。”

"You?" said Madame Danglars.

"Yes, I."

"I think, sir, you exaggerate your situation," said Madame Danglars, whose beautiful eyes sparkled for a moment. "The paths of which you were just speaking have been traced by all young men of ardent imaginations. Besides the pleasure, there is always remorse from the indulgence of our passions, and, after all, what have you men to fear from all this? the world excuses, and notoriety ennobles you."

  “我想,閣下,你未免律己太嚴,把情形夸大了吧,”騰格拉爾夫人那雙美麗的眼睛一時間閃爍了一下。”您剛才所說的那种道路,凡是熱情的青年,都是曾經歷過的。當我們沉溺在熱情里的時候,除了快樂,總會覺得有些懊喪,福音書上曾為此舉出了許多可歌可泣的例子,以改邪歸正末安慰我們——我們這些可怜的女人。所以,我可以說,每當回憶起我們年輕時代的那些荒唐行為時,有時候,我想上帝已經寬恕了那些事了,因為我們所遭受的种种痛苦即使不能使我們免罪,但或許也可以贖罪的。但您——你們男人,社會人士是從來不會責怪你們的,愈多受非議愈能抬高你們的身份——您為什么要為那种事愁苦呢?”

"Madame," replied Villefort, "you know that I am no hypocrite, or, at least, that I never deceive without a reason. If my brow be severe, it is because many misfortunes have clouded it; if my heart be petrified, it is that it might sustain the blows it has received. I was not so in my youth, I was not so on the night of the betrothal, when we were all seated around a table in the Rue du Cours at Marseilles. But since then everything has changed in and about me; I am accustomed to brave difficulties, and, in the conflict to crush those who, by their own free will, or by chance, voluntarily or involuntarily, interfere with me in my career. It is generally the case that what we most ardently desire is as ardently withheld from us by those who wish to obtain it, or from whom we attempt to snatch it. Thus, the greater number of a man's errors come before him disguised under the specious form of necessity; then, after error has been committed in a moment of excitement, of delirium, or of fear, we see that we might have avoided and escaped it. The means we might have used, which we in our blindness could not see, then seem simple and easy, and we say, 'Why did I not do this, instead of that?' Women, on the contrary, are rarely tormented with remorse; for the decision does not come from you,—your misfortunes are generally imposed upon you, and your faults the results of others' crimes."

"In any case, sir, you will allow," replied Madame Danglars, "that, even if the fault were alone mine, I last night received a severe punishment for it."

  “夫人,”維爾福答道,“您知道我不是偽君子,或至少我從不毫無理由地自己騙自己。假如說我的額頭上殺气太重的話,那是因為那上面凝聚著許多不幸;假如說我的心已經僵化,那是因為只有這樣才能經得住所遭受的打擊。我在年輕的時候并不是這樣的。在我訂婚的那天晚上,當我們大家圍坐在馬賽高碌路侯爵府的桌子旁邊時,我并不是這樣的。但從那時起,我周圍和內心的一切都改變了,我已習慣于抵抗困難,已習慣于在斗爭中打垮那些有意或無意、自動或被動來擋住我的路的人。照一般的情形來說,凡是我們所最熱切希望得到的東西,也就是旁人最熱切希望阻止我們獲得或阻止我們搶奪的東西。因此,人類的過失,在未犯之前,總覺得自己有很正當的理由,是必需這么做的,于是,在一時的興奮、迷亂或恐懼之下,過錯鑄成了。而在出了錯以后,我們才看到它本來是可以避免的。我們本來可以用某种很正當的手段的,但那种手段我們事先卻一點都看不到,只有事后卻似乎覺得很簡單容易,于是我們就說:‘我為什么要這樣做而不那樣做呢?’ 女人卻恰恰相反,女人很少吃后悔藥——因為事情并不是由你們決定的,你們的不幸通常都是別人加到你們身上來的,而你們的過失也几乎總是別人造成的。”

"Poor thing," said Villefort, pressing her hand, "it was too severe for your strength, for you were twice overwhelmed, and yet"—

"Well?"

"Well, I must tell you. Collect all your courage, for you have not yet heard all."

  “可是無論如何,閣下,您大概可以承認,”騰格拉爾夫人答道,“即使那件事全是我一個人的錯,昨天晚上我也已經受到了一次嚴重的懲罰。”

"Ah," exclaimed Madame Danglars, alarmed, "what is there more to hear?"

  “可怜的女人!”維爾福緊握著她的手說道,“這的确不是您所能受得了的,因為您已經受到兩次嚴重的打擊了。可是——”

"You only look back to the past, and it is, indeed, bad enough. Well, picture to yourself a future more gloomy still—certainly frightful, perhaps sanguinary." The baroness knew how calm Villefort naturally was, and his present excitement frightened her so much that she opened her mouth to scream, but the sound died in her throat. "How has this terrible past been recalled?" cried Villefort; "how is it that it has escaped from the depths of the tomb and the recesses of our hearts, where it was buried, to visit us now, like a phantom, whitening our cheeks and flushing our brows with shame?"

  “怎么?”

  “嗯,我必須告訴您。鼓起您的全部勇气,因為您還沒有走完那條路。”

  “天哪!騰格拉爾夫人惊惶地大聲叫道,“還有什么呢?”

  “您只是回顧過去,過去的确是坏极了。嗯,可是您不得不為將來畫一幅更可怕的畫面,或許會更慘!”

  男爵夫人知道維爾福一向克己鎮定,但目前這种激動的情緒使她感到非常惊怕,她張開嘴想大聲呼喊,但那個喊聲剛一升到她的喉嚨里便又哽住了。

"Alas," said Hermine, "doubtless it is chance."

"Chance?" replied Villefort; "No, no, madame, there is no such thing as chance."

  “這件可怕的往事是怎么被喚醒的?”維爾福大聲說道,“它本來已被埋葬在我們內心的深處,現在它怎么又象一個幽靈似的從墳墓里逃了出來,重新來拜訪我們,嚇白了我們的面頰,羞紅了我們的額頭?”

"Oh, yes; has not a fatal chance revealed all this? Was it not by chance the Count of Monte Cristo bought that house? Was it not by chance he caused the earth to be dug up? Is it not by chance that the unfortunate child was disinterred under the trees?—that poor innocent offspring of mine, which I never even kissed, but for whom I wept many, many tears. Ah, my heart clung to the count when he mentioned the dear spoil found beneath the flowers."

  “唉!”愛米娜說,“毫無疑問只是碰巧而已!”

  “碰巧!”維爾福答道,“不,不,夫人,世界上根本沒有碰巧這种東西!”

"Well, no, madame,—this is the terrible news I have to tell you," said Villefort in a hollow voice—"no, nothing was found beneath the flowers; there was no child disinterred—no. You must not weep, no, you must not groan, you must tremble!"

"What can you mean?" asked Madame Danglars, shuddering.

  “噢,有的。這一切難道不都是碰巧發生的嗎?難道基督山伯爵不是碰巧買了那座房子?難道他不是碰巧去挖那個花園?難道不是碰巧在那棵樹底下挖出了那個不幸的孩子的尸体?——我那可怜的無辜的孩子,我甚至連吻都沒吻過他。為了他,我流過多少眼淚啊!啊,當伯爵提到他在花叢底下挖到我那寶貝的殘骸的時候,我的心都跟著他去了。”

"I mean that M. de Monte Cristo, digging underneath these trees, found neither skeleton nor chest, because neither of them was there!"

"Neither of them there?" repeated Madame Danglars, her staring, wide-open eyes expressing her alarm.

  “哦,不,夫人!我要告訴您的正是這個可怕的消息,”維爾福用一种深沉的語調說道。“不,花叢底下根本什么東西都沒有。那儿根本沒有什么孩子的尸体。不,您不必再為此哭泣了,您也不必唉聲歎气了,您該發抖才是!”

"Neither of them there!" she again said, as though striving to impress herself with the meaning of the words which escaped her.

  “您這是什么意思?”騰格拉爾夫人問道,不禁打了一個寒顫。

"No," said Villefort, burying his face in his hands, "no, a hundred times no!"

"Then you did not bury the poor child there, sir? Why did you deceive me? Where did you place it? tell me—where?"

  “我的意思是:基督山先生在樹叢底下挖掘的時候,并沒有找到什么骸骨或箱子,因為那儿根本沒有這兩樣東西!”

"There! But listen to me—listen—and you will pity me who has for twenty years alone borne the heavy burden of grief I am about to reveal, without casting the least portion upon you."

  “根本沒有這兩樣東西!”騰格拉爾夫人惊恐地睜大了眼睛,死盯著維爾福。“根本沒有這兩樣東西!”她又說了一遍,象是要用自己的聲音抓住這句話,深怕它逃走似的。

"Oh, you frighten me! But speak; I will listen."

  “沒有!”維爾福把臉埋在雙手里,說道,“沒有!根本什么都沒有!”

"You recollect that sad night, when you were half-expiring on that bed in the red damask room, while I, scarcely less agitated than you, awaited your delivery. The child was born, was given to me—motionless, breathless, voiceless; we thought it dead." Madame Danglars moved rapidly, as though she would spring from her chair, but Villefort stopped, and clasped his hands as if to implore her attention. "We thought it dead," he repeated; "I placed it in the chest, which was to take the place of a coffin; I descended to the garden, I dug a hole, and then flung it down in haste. Scarcely had I covered it with earth, when the arm of the Corsican was stretched towards me; I saw a shadow rise, and, at the same time, a flash of light. I felt pain; I wished to cry out, but an icy shiver ran through my veins and stifled my voice; I fell lifeless, and fancied myself killed. Never shall I forget your sublime courage, when, having returned to consciousness, I dragged myself to the foot of the stairs, and you, almost dying yourself, came to meet me. We were obliged to keep silent upon the dreadful catastrophe. You had the fortitude to regain the house, assisted by your nurse. A duel was the pretext for my wound. Though we scarcely expected it, our secret remained in our own keeping alone. I was taken to Versailles; for three months I struggled with death; at last, as I seemed to cling to life, I was ordered to the South. Four men carried me from Paris to Chalons, walking six leagues a day; Madame de Villefort followed the litter in her carriage. At Chalons I was put upon the Saone, thence I passed on to the Rhone, whence I descended, merely with the current, to Arles; at Arles I was again placed on my litter, and continued my journey to Marseilles. My recovery lasted six months. I never heard you mentioned, and I did not dare inquire for you. When I returned to Paris, I learned that you, the widow of M. de Nargonne, had married M. Danglars.

"What was the subject of my thoughts from the time consciousness returned to me? Always the same—always the child's corpse, coming every night in my dreams, rising from the earth, and hovering over the grave with menacing look and gesture. I inquired immediately on my return to Paris; the house had not been inhabited since we left it, but it had just been let for nine years. I found the tenant. I pretended that I disliked the idea that a house belonging to my wife's father and mother should pass into the hands of strangers. I offered to pay them for cancelling the lease; they demanded 6,000 francs. I would have given 10,000—I would have given 20,000. I had the money with me; I made the tenant sign the deed of resilition, and when I had obtained what I so much wanted, I galloped to Auteuil.

  “那么您沒把那可怜的孩子埋在那個地方了,閣下?您為什么要騙我——為什么?喂,請說呀!”

  “我把它埋在了那個地方!您听我說,您听完以后就會可怜我的,因為二十年來,我始終一個人忍受著這份煎熬,絲毫沒有讓您來分擔,但現在我不得不講出來了。”

  “我的上帝,您真的嚇坏我啦!快點講吧,我想听。”

  “您還記得那個悲慘的晚上吧,您在那個挂紅緞窗帘的房間里躺在床上奄奄一息的時候,我,則怀著和您同樣激動不安的心情,等待著您的分娩。孩子生下來了,交給了我,他不會動,不會哭,也不會呼吸,我們以為他死了。”騰格拉爾夫人做了一個吃惊的動作,象是要從椅子上跳起來似的。維爾福急忙止住了她,緊握著她的雙手,象是在請求她注意傾听似的。“我們以為他死了,”他重复說道。“我就拿了一只箱子暫且代替棺材,把他放到了里面,我下樓到了花園里,挖了一個洞,匆匆地埋了那只箱子。我剛把土蓋上,那個科西嘉人的胳膊便向我伸了過來,我看到一個影子猛地跳出來,同時看到亮光一閃。我便只覺得一陣疼痛,我想喊叫,但一股冰一般的寒顫穿過我的血管,窒息了我的聲音,我昏死了過去,我以為自己已經被殺死了。當我恢复知覺以后,我一絲半气地拖著自己爬到了樓梯腳下,您盡管自己已累得精疲力盡,但仍在那儿接我。我永遠忘不了您那种崇高的勇气。我們不得不對那次可怕的災禍保持緘默。您以堅忍不拔的精神,在您的護士的照料下回到了您的家里。我的受傷算是一場決斗的結果。盡管我們本來也知道這個秘密很難保守,但我們還是保守住了。我被帶回到凡爾賽,和死神掙扎了三個月。最后,我似乎到了生命的邊緣,我被送到南部去了。四個人把我從巴黎抬到了夏龍,每天只走十八里路。維爾福夫人坐著馬車跟在擔架后面。到了夏龍以后,我就乘船從索恩河轉入羅納河,順流漂到阿爾,到了阿爾,我又被放到擔架上,繼續向馬賽前進。我養了六個月的傷才痊愈。我始終沒有听人說起過您,我也不敢向人打听您的消息。當我回到巴黎的時候,我才打听到,您,奈剛尼先生的未亡人,已經嫁給騰格拉爾先生了。

"No one had entered the house since I had left it. It was five o'clock in the afternoon; I ascended into the red room, and waited for night. There all the thoughts which had disturbed me during my year of constant agony came back with double force. The Corsican, who had declared the vendetta against me, who had followed me from Nimes to Paris, who had hid himself in the garden, who had struck me, had seen me dig the grave, had seen me inter the child,—he might become acquainted with your person,—nay, he might even then have known it. Would he not one day make you pay for keeping this terrible secret? Would it not be a sweet revenge for him when he found that I had not died from the blow of his dagger? It was therefore necessary, before everything else, and at all risks, that I should cause all traces of the past to disappear—that I should destroy every material vestige; too much reality would always remain in my recollection. It was for this I had annulled the lease—it was for this I had come—it was for this I was waiting. Night arrived; I allowed it to become quite dark. I was without a light in that room; when the wind shook all the doors, behind which I continually expected to see some spy concealed, I trembled. I seemed everywhere to hear your moans behind me in the bed, and I dared not turn around. My heart beat so violently that I feared my wound would open. At length, one by one, all the noises in the neighborhood ceased. I understood that I had nothing to fear, that I should neither be seen nor heard, so I decided upon descending to the garden.

  “自從我恢复知覺以后,我心里所想的?始終只有一樣東西——即是那孩子的尸体。他每天晚上在我的夢中出現,從地底下爬起來,气勢洶洶地盤旋在墳墓的上空。我一回到巴黎,就立刻去打听。自從我們离開以后,那座房子還沒有住過人,但它剛租了出去,租期是九年。我找到那個租戶。我假裝說我不愿意我岳父母的房子落到外人手里。我請他們轉讓出來。他們提出要六千法郎。就是要一万兩我也得給,我是帶著錢去的。我叫那租戶在退租契約上簽了字,獲得了那張我非常需要的東西以后,我就馬上疾馳到了歐特伊。自從我离開以后,還沒有一個人踏進過那座房子。那時是下午五點鐘,我上樓走進那個挂紅色窗帘的房間,等待著天黑。那時,我一年來在精神上受极大痛苦的种种念頭都同時鑽上心來。那個科西嘉人,他曾發誓要向我為親复仇,他曾從尼姆跟蹤我到了巴黎,他曾躲在花園里,他曾襲擊了我,曾看到過我掘那個墳,曾看到過我埋那個孩子,他或許會去打听您是什么人——不,他或許甚至在當時就已經知道了。將來有一天,難道他不會以此要挾來敲詐您嗎?當他發覺我并沒有被他刺死的時候,這不是他最方便的報复方法嗎?所以,最最重复的事情,是我應該不惜冒任何危險來把過去的一切痕跡都抹掉。我應該抹掉一切能看到的形跡,在我的腦海里,這一切所留下的記憶太真實了。我就是為了這個原因才要取消那租約;并來到這里在房間里等待著。夜晚來臨了,我一直等到深夜。我沒在那個房間里點燈。當風吹得那些門窗嘩啦作響的時候,我發抖了,我隨時都准備會在門背后發現一個躲藏著的人。我似乎處處都听到您在我身后的床上呻吟,我不敢回頭去看。我的心跳异常的猛烈,以致我竟怕我的傷口會爆裂開來。終于,所有的這些聲音都一一沉寂了下去。我知道我沒什么可怕的了,沒有人會看到或听到我,于是我決定下樓到花園里去。

"Listen, Hermine; I consider myself as brave as most men, but when I drew from my breast the little key of the staircase, which I had found in my coat—that little key we both used to cherish so much, which you wished to have fastened to a golden ring—when I opened the door, and saw the pale moon shedding a long stream of white light on the spiral staircase like a spectre, I leaned against the wall, and nearly shrieked. I seemed to be going mad. At last I mastered my agitation. I descended the staircase step by step; the only thing I could not conquer was a strange trembling in my knees. I grasped the railings; if I had relaxed my hold for a moment, I should have fallen. I reached the lower door. Outside this door a spade was placed against the wall; I took it, and advanced towards the thicket. I had provided myself with a dark lantern. In the middle of the lawn I stopped to light it, then I continued my path.

  “听著,愛米娜!我認為自己的勇气并不比一般人差,我從上衣口袋里摸出那把開樓梯門的小鑰匙。我們以前是怎么珍視那把小鑰匙,您還曾希望把它拴在一只金戒指上呢。當我打開那扇門,看到蒼白的月光泄到那座象鬼怪似的螺旋形樓梯上的時候,我一下子靠到了牆上,几乎失聲大叫起來。我似乎快要發瘋了。但我終于控制住了自己激動的情緒。我一步一步地走下樓梯,我唯一無法克服的就是我的雙腿不停地在發抖。我緊緊地抓住了欄杆,只要我一松手,就會摔下去。我走到下面門口。在這扇門外,有一把鏟子靠在牆上,我拿了它向樹叢走去。我帶著一盞遮光燈籠。到了草坪中央,我把它點了起來,然后繼續向前走。

"It was the end of November, all the verdure of the garden had disappeared, the trees were nothing more than skeletons with their long bony arms, and the dead leaves sounded on the gravel under my feet. My terror overcame me to such a degree as I approached the thicket, that I took a pistol from my pocket and armed myself. I fancied continually that I saw the figure of the Corsican between the branches. I examined the thicket with my dark lantern; it was empty. I looked carefully around; I was indeed alone,—no noise disturbed the silence but the owl, whose piercing cry seemed to be calling up the phantoms of the night. I tied my lantern to a forked branch I had noticed a year before at the precise spot where I stopped to dig the hole.

"The grass had grown very thickly there during the summer, and when autumn arrived no one had been there to mow it. Still one place where the grass was thin attracted my attention; it evidently was there I had turned up the ground. I went to work. The hour, then, for which I had been waiting during the last year had at length arrived. How I worked, how I hoped, how I struck every piece of turf, thinking to find some resistance to my spade! But no, I found nothing, though I had made a hole twice as large as the first. I thought I had been deceived—had mistaken the spot. I turned around, I looked at the trees, I tried to recall the details which had struck me at the time. A cold, sharp wind whistled through the leafless branches, and yet the drops fell from my forehead. I recollected that I was stabbed just as I was trampling the ground to fill up the hole; while doing so I had leaned against a laburnum; behind me was an artificial rockery, intended to serve as a resting-place for persons walking in the garden; in falling, my hand, relaxing its hold of the laburnum, felt the coldness of the stone. On my right I saw the tree, behind me the rock. I stood in the same attitude, and threw myself down. I rose, and again began digging and enlarging the hole; still I found nothing, nothing—the chest was no longer there!"

  “當時是十一月底。花園里已毫無生气,樹木只剩了一些長條枝子,石子路上的枯葉在我的腳下索索作響。我害怕极了,當我走近樹叢的時候,我甚至從口袋里摸出了一把手槍來給自己壯膽。我好象覺得時時都能在樹枝叢中看到那個科西嘉人的影子。我提著遮光燈籠去檢查樹叢,樹叢里什么也沒有。我四下里看了看,的确只有我一個人。貓頭鷹在凄厲地啼叫著,象是在召喚黑夜里的游魂,除了它的哀訴以外,再沒有別的聲音來扰亂這里的寂靜了。我把燈籠挂在一條樹枝上,我注意到這正是我一年前掘洞的地方。經過一個夏天的時間,草已長得非常茂密了,秋天到了,也沒人去除掉它。可是,有一塊地方的草比較稀疏,這吸引了我的注意。這顯然就是我以前挖掘的地方。我開始工作起來。我期待了一年的時刻終于到了。我非常用力地工作,怀著急切的希望,使勁地一鏟一鏟地掘下去,以為我的鏟子會碰到某种東西。但是沒有,我什么也沒找到,雖然我所掘的洞比以前大了兩倍。我以為自己弄錯了地點。我轉回身來,望著樹叢,极力回憶當時的各种情形。一陣尖厲的冷風呼嘯著穿過無葉的樹枝,汗從我的額頭上冒了出來。我記得被刺的時候我正在往洞里填泥土。我一面踩,一面扶著一棵假烏木樹。我的身后有一塊供散步時休息用的假山石。在倒下去的時候,我的手松開了樹,曾碰到了那塊冰涼的石頭。我看到右面是那棵樹,身后仍舊是那塊石頭。我站到以前那個位置上,故意倒下去試一試。我爬起來,重新開始挖掘,并擴大了那個洞,可是我依舊什么也沒找到,什么都沒有。那只箱子不見了!”

  “那只箱子不見了!”騰格拉爾夫人低聲惊叫道,嚇得呼吸几乎都停止了。

"The chest no longer there?" murmured Madame Danglars, choking with fear.

  “別以為這樣一次就算完了,”維爾福繼續說。“不,我把整個樹叢都搜索了一遍。我想,那個刺客看到這只箱子,或許以為那是一箱寶物,想把它偷走。在發覺了真象以后,就另外掘了一個洞把它埋了起來,但樹叢里什么也沒有。于是我突然想到,他不會這樣小心,只是把它拋在一個角落里去了。如果是這樣,我必須等到天亮以后才能去找。于是我又回到了房間里去等候。”

"Think not I contented myself with this one effort," continued Villefort. "No; I searched the whole thicket. I thought the assassin, having discovered the chest, and supposing it to be a treasure, had intended carrying it off, but, perceiving his error, had dug another hole, and deposited it there; but I could find nothing. Then the idea struck me that he had not taken these precautions, and had simply thrown it in a corner. In the last case I must wait for daylight to renew my search. I remained the room and waited."

"Oh, heavens!"

  “天哪!”

  “天亮的時候,我又下去了。我首先去看了一下那個樹叢。希望能找到一些在黑暗中疏忽過去的痕跡。我挖了一片二十呎見方、兩呎多深的地面。一個工人一天都干不完的工作,我在一小時內就完成了。但我什么也沒找到——絕對什么也沒有。于是我根据那只箱子被拋在某個角落里的假定,開始去搜尋。要是果真拋在某個角落里,大概就在那條通小門去的路上,但仍然毫無結果。我帶著一顆爆裂的心回到了樹叢里,現在我對樹叢已不再抱有什么希望了。”

When daylight dawned I went down again. My first visit was to the thicket. I hoped to find some traces which had escaped me in the darkness. I had turned up the earth over a surface of more than twenty feet square, and a depth of two feet. A laborer would not have done in a day what occupied me an hour. But I could find nothing—absolutely nothing. Then I renewed the search. Supposing it had been thrown aside, it would probably be on the path which led to the little gate; but this examination was as useless as the first, and with a bursting heart I returned to the thicket, which now contained no hope for me."

  “噢,”騰格拉爾夫人大聲說道,“這已足以使您發瘋了!”

  “我當時也曾這樣希望,”維爾福說,“但我并不那么走運。總之,當我的精力恢复過來的時候,我就說:‘那人為什么要把死尸偷走呢?’”

  “您曾說,”騰格拉爾夫人答道,“他需要把他當作一种證据,不是嗎?”

"Oh," cried Madame Danglars, "it was enough to drive you mad!"

  “啊不,夫人,那是沒法做到。尸体是不能保存一年的,只要把他拿給法官看過,證据就成立了。但那种事并沒有發生。”

"I hoped for a moment that it might," said Villefort; "but that happiness was denied me. However, recovering my strength and my ideas, 'Why,' said I, 'should that man have carried away the corpse?'"

  “那么又怎么樣了呢?”愛米娜渾身索索地發著抖問道。

"But you said," replied Madame Danglars, "he would require it as a proof."

  “我們要遇到一件更可怕、更致命、更令人惊惶的事情了!那孩子當初也許還活著,是那個刺客救了他!”

"Ah, no, madame, that could not be. Dead bodies are not kept a year; they are shown to a magistrate, and the evidence is taken. Now, nothing of the kind has happened."

"What then?" asked Hermine, trembling violently.

  騰格拉爾夫人發出一聲尖銳的喊叫,抓住了維爾福的雙手。“我的孩子是活著的!”她說,“您活埋了我的孩子,閣下!您沒有确定我的孩子是否真的死了,就把他埋了!啊——”

"Something more terrible, more fatal, more alarming for us—the child was, perhaps, alive, and the assassin may have saved it!"

  騰格拉爾夫人這時已經站了起來,帶著一种近乎威脅的表情挺立在檢察官前面,檢察官的雙手依舊被握在她那軟弱的手掌里。

Madame Danglars uttered a piercing cry, and, seizing Villefort's hands, exclaimed, "My child was alive?" said she; "you buried my child alive? You were not certain my child was dead, and you buried it? Ah"—

  “我怎么知道呢?我只是這樣猜想,我也可以猜想別的情形。”維爾福回答,眼睛呆瞪瞪的,說明那強有力的頭腦已到了絕望和瘋狂的邊緣了。

Madame Danglars had risen, and stood before the procureur, whose hands she wrung in her feeble grasp. "I know not; I merely suppose so, as I might suppose anything else," replied Villefort with a look so fixed, it indicated that his powerful mind was on the verge of despair and madness. "Ah, my child, my poor child!" cried the baroness, falling on her chair, and stifling her sobs in her handkerchief. Villefort, becoming somewhat reassured, perceived that to avert the maternal storm gathering over his head, he must inspire Madame Danglars with the terror he felt. "You understand, then, that if it were so," said he, rising in his turn, and approaching the baroness, to speak to her in a lower tone, "we are lost. This child lives, and some one knows it lives—some one is in possession of our secret; and since Monte Cristo speaks before us of a child disinterred, when that child could not be found, it is he who is in possession of our secret."

  “啊,我的孩子,我那可怜的孩子!”男爵夫人大聲說道。

  她又一下子倒在椅子里,用手帕捂著嘴啜泣起來。

  維爾福竭力恢复了他的理智,他覺得要轉變當前這場母性風波,就必須以他自己所感到的恐怖來啟發騰格拉爾夫人,他湊近了一步,壓低了聲音對她說,“我們完啦。這個孩子是活著的,有一個人知道他是活著的。那個人因此而掌握著我們的秘密。既然基督山對我們說他挖掘出一個孩子的尸体,而實際上那個孩子是根本不可能挖掘到的,所以,掌握我們秘密的那個人就是他。”

  “天哪!天哪!”騰格拉爾夫人喃喃地說道。

  維爾福聲含糊的呻吟了一聲。

  “那個孩子——那個孩子呢?”那激動的母親追問。

"Just God, avenging God!" murmured Madame Danglars.

Villefort's only answer was a stifled groan.

"But the child—the child, sir?" repeated the agitated mother.

"How I have searched for him," replied Villefort, wringing his hands; "how I have called him in my long sleepless nights; how I have longed for royal wealth to purchase a million of secrets from a million of men, and to find mine among them! At last, one day, when for the hundredth time I took up my spade, I asked myself again and again what the Corsican could have done with the child. A child encumbers a fugitive; perhaps, on perceiving it was still alive, he had thrown it into the river."

  “您不知道我曾經是怎樣地找過他!”維爾福緊握著自己的雙手回答。“您不知道我在那些無法入睡的長夜里曾怎樣地呼喚他!您不知道我是多么渴望自己能富甲王侯,以便從一百万人里去買到一百万個秘密,希望在其中找到我所需要的消息!后來,有一天,當我第一百次拿起那把鏟子的時候,我又再三自問,究竟那個科西嘉人把那孩子怎么樣了。一個孩子會連累一個亡命者的,或許他覺察到他還活著,就把他拋到河里去了。”

  “嗯,是的,是的!”男爵夫人喊道,“我的孩子肯定在那儿!”

"Impossible!" cried Madame Danglars: "a man may murder another out of revenge, but he would not deliberately drown a child."

  “我急忙赶到了醫院,深知那天晚上,即九月二十日的晚上,的确曾有人送了一個孩子到那儿,他是裹在一張特意對半撕開的麻紗餐巾里送去的,在那一半餐巾上,有半個男爵的紋章和一個H字。”

"Perhaps," continued Villefort, "he had put it in the foundling hospital."

"Oh, yes, yes," cried the baroness; "my child is there!"

  “對呀!”騰格拉爾夫人喊道,“我的餐巾上都有這种標記。奈剛尼先生是一個男爵,而我的名字叫愛米娜。感謝上帝!我的孩子沒死!”

"I ran to the hospital, and learned that the same night—the night of the 20th of September—a child had been brought there, wrapped in part of a fine linen napkin, purposely torn in half. This portion of the napkin was marked with half a baron's crown, and the letter H."

  “沒有,他沒死。”

  “您告訴了我這么好的消息,不怕把我樂死嗎,閣下?他在哪儿?我的孩子在哪儿?”

"Truly, truly," said Madame Danglars, "all my linen is marked thus; Monsieur de Nargonne was a baronet, and my name is Hermine. Thank God, my child was not then dead!"

"No, it was not dead."

  維爾福聳了聳肩。“我怎么知道呢?”他說道,“假如我知道的話,您難道以為我還會象一個作家或小說家那樣,把這件事從頭到尾都詳詳細細地描述給您听嗎?唉,不,我不知道,大概六個月以后,一個女人帶著另外那半塊餐巾來要求把孩子領回去。這個女人所講的情形一點都不錯,于是他們就讓她領了回去。 ”

"And you can tell me so without fearing to make me die of joy? Where is the child?" Villefort shrugged his shoulders. "Do I know?" said he; "and do you believe that if I knew I would relate to you all its trials and all its adventures as would a dramatist or a novel writer? Alas, no, I know not. A woman, about six months after, came to claim it with the other half of the napkin. This woman gave all the requisite particulars, and it was intrusted to her."

  “您應該去探訪那個女人,您應該去跟蹤追尋她。”

  “您以為我當時在干什么,夫人?我假裝說要調查一樁案子,發動了所有最机警的密探和干員去搜索她。他們跟蹤她到了夏龍,但到了夏龍以后,就失蹤了。”

  “他們沒能找到她?”

"But you should have inquired for the woman; you should have traced her."

  “是的,再也沒找到。”

"And what do you think I did? I feigned a criminal process, and employed all the most acute bloodhounds and skilful agents in search of her. They traced her to Chalons, and there they lost her."

  騰格拉爾夫人在听這一番追述的時候,時而歎息,時而流淚,時而惊呼。“這就完了嗎?”她說,“您就到那一步為止了嗎?”

"They lost her?"

"Yes, forever." Madame Danglars had listened to this recital with a sigh, a tear, or a shriek for every detail. "And this is all?" said she; "and you stopped there?"

  “不,不!”維爾福說,“我從來沒停止過搜索和探問。可是,最近兩三年來,我略微松懈了一點。但現在我應當更堅決勇猛地來重新調查。您不久就會看到我的成功,因為現在驅使我的已不再是良心,而是恐懼。”

"Oh, no," said Villefort; "I never ceased to search and to inquire. However, the last two or three years I had allowed myself some respite. But now I will begin with more perseverance and fury than ever, since fear urges me, not my conscience."

  “但是,”騰格拉爾夫人回答說,“基督山伯爵是不可能知道的,否則他就不會來和我們交往了。”

  “噢,人心難測啊”維爾福說,“因為人的惡超過了上帝的善。您有沒有注意到那人對我們講話時的那种眼光?”

"But," replied Madame Danglars, "the Count of Monte Cristo can know nothing, or he would not seek our society as he does."

  “沒有。”

  “但您總仔細觀察過他吧?”

"Oh, the wickedness of man is very great," said Villefort, "since it surpasses the goodness of God. Did you observe that man's eyes while he was speaking to us?"

"No."

"But have you ever watched him carefully?"

  “那當然羅。他很古怪,但僅此而已。我注意到一點,就是他放在我們面前那些珍饈美味,他自己一點都不嘗一下,他總是吃另外一個碟子里的東西。”

"Doubtless he is capricious, but that is all; one thing alone struck me,—of all the exquisite things he placed before us, he touched nothing. I might have suspected he was poisoning us."

  “是的,是的!”維爾福說,“我也注意到了那一點,假如我當時知道了現在所知道的一切,我就什么都不會吃的,我會以為他想毒死我們。”

"And you see you would have been deceived."

  “您知道您猜錯了。”

"Yes, doubtless."

"But believe me, that man has other projects. For that reason I wished to see you, to speak to you, to warn you against every one, but especially against him. Tell me," cried Villefort, fixing his eyes more steadfastly on her than he had ever done before, "did you ever reveal to any one our connection?"

  “是的,那是毫無疑問的,但相信我吧,那人還有別的陰謀。就為了這個,我才要求見您一面,跟您談一談,并提醒您要小心提防每一個人,尤其要防著他。告訴我,”維爾福的目光极堅定地盯住她,大聲問道,“您是否曾向別人泄漏過我們的關系?”

  “沒有,從來沒有。”

"Never, to any one."

"You understand me," replied Villefort, affectionately; "when I say any one,—pardon my urgency,—to any one living I mean?"

  “您懂我的意思嗎?”維爾福懇切地說,“當我說別人的時候,請恕我急不擇言,我的意思是指世界上的任何人。”

"Yes, yes, I understand very well," ejaculated the baroness; "never, I swear to you."

  “是的,是的,很明白,”男爵夫人面紅耳赤地說,“從來沒有,我向您發誓。”

"Were you ever in the habit of writing in the evening what had transpired in the morning? Do you keep a journal?"

  “您有沒有把白天發生的事在晚上記錄下來的那种習慣?您有日記本?”

"No, my life has been passed in frivolity; I wish to forget it myself."

"Do you talk in your sleep?"

  “沒有,唉!我的生活毫無意義。我希望自己能忘掉它。”

"I sleep soundly, like a child; do you not remember?" The color mounted to the baroness's face, and Villefort turned awfully pale.

  “您說不說夢話?”

  “我睡覺的時候象個小孩子一樣,您不記得了嗎?”男爵夫人的臉上泛起了紅暈,而維爾福卻臉色變白了。

"It is true," said he, in so low a tone that he could hardly be heard.

"Well?" said the baroness.

  “這倒是真的。”他說道,聲音低得連他自己都難于听到。

"Well, I understand what I now have to do," replied Villefort. "In less than one week from this time I will ascertain who this M. de Monte Cristo is, whence he comes, where he goes, and why he speaks in our presence of children that have been disinterred in a garden." Villefort pronounced these words with an accent which would have made the count shudder had he heard him. Then he pressed the hand the baroness reluctantly gave him, and led her respectfully back to the door. Madame Danglars returned in another cab to the passage, on the other side of which she found her carriage, and her coachman sleeping peacefully on his box while waiting for her.

  “怎么?”男爵夫人說。

  “嗯,我知道現在該怎么辦了,”維爾福回答。“從現在起,一個星期之內,我就可以弄清楚這位基督山先生到底是誰,他從哪儿來,要到哪儿去,為什么他要對我們說他在花園里挖到孩子的尸体。”

  維爾福說這几句話時的語气,要是伯爵听到了,一定會打個寒顫的。他吻了一下男爵夫人不太情愿地伸給他的那只手,恭恭敬敬地領她到門口。騰格拉爾夫人另外雇了一輛出租馬車到了巷口,在那條小巷的另一端找到了自己的馬車,她的車夫正安安穩穩地睡在座位上等她。